“Run, River Currents” by Ginger Marcinkowski

LITTLE GIRL LOST

As the last of the mourners departed the ornate Catholic Church, Emily entered a side door unnoticed, walked to the coffin, and punched her dead father in the face. “You’ll never be dead enough,” she whispered. “Never.” Determined to recover from the hands of a father who sexually abused her and an emotionally distant mother, twenty-seven-year-old Emily Evans seeks the peace she’d lost in her youth. Yet, shattered by the betrayal of those she was taught to respect and love, she fears that she may never overcome the devastating effects of generations of abuse. Will she ever let herself truly open up to the power of unconditional love? Set in the rich backwoods of New Brunswick, Canada, Run, River Currents is inspired by a true story of abuse, pain, and the struggle to find healing and forgiveness.

Ginger Marcinkowski was born in northern Maine along the Canadian border, a location that plays a prominent role in Run, River Currents. She is a daughter of divorced parents and one of eight siblings.

Her debut novel, Run, River Currents, was a 2012 semifinalist in the Association of Christian Fiction Writers (ACFW) Genesis Awards.

Ginger has been a public speaker and visiting lecturer for many years. She has been a professional reader for the James Jones First Novel Award ($10,000 prize) and is currently a judge for the East-West Writer’s Contest. Her works have been awarded honorable mentions, and she has placed in several writing contests. She is looking forward to writing full-time in 2013.

Ginger Marcinkowski was born in northern Maine along the Canadian border, which plays a prominent role in Run, River Currents. She is a daughter of divorced parents and one of eight siblings.

Her debut novel, Run, River Currents, was published in August 2012 and was a 2012 semi-finalist in the Association of Christian Fiction Writers (ACFW) Genesis Awards. Although this book is fictionalized, the dark incidents (child abuse – beatings, neglect, and sexual abuse) were true events in her childhood home. With this book, she hopes to help spouses and friends of abuse victims understand where their loved ones’ perspectives of life, God, and relationships often come from while also showing that it is possible to escape from the dark mind-set to which a victim often clings.

For more on Ginger, check out her blog, Facebook page and Twitter profile.

Source for pictures and bio.

My Review:

Ginger Marcinkowski has written a very real and raw view of what happens when generations of domestic and child sexual abuse happens in the home unabated.  If the sexual abuse is not addressed and worked through, rage (“You will never be dead enough”), dysfunction, estrangement, and shame can follow the child(ren) for a lifetime.  But the author leaves you with a picture of hope through the redeeming love and power of God.

The author uses unique, picturesque phrases that help you depict the scenes on a multi-level sense of understanding.  Some of the language is crude in some ways, but I remember things being spoken that way before coming to the Lord.

Her book, Run, River Currents, is useful in helping spouses or friends of an adult who have been sexually abused as a child to understand how their emotional growth is stunted and how it has warped their thinking about men, God, and marriage.  And as a reminder, “getting over it” doesn’t happen at the snap of a finger.

Though this particular book is fiction, but it is based on the author’s childhood.  It’s a great book to open up a frank conversation about the issues and to hopefully help families end the violence, be it domestic or sexual abuse.

This book was provided free by Lori Higham at Booktrope in exchange for my honest review.  No monetary compensation was exchanged.

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One thought on ““Run, River Currents” by Ginger Marcinkowski

  1. Thank you for your honest view of RUN, RIVER CURRENTS, Linda! You are right; people do not tend to get over abuse at the snap of a finger. It is often very difficult to see anything except ugliness while in a difficult situation, yet the Lord is there, too, and He does weep with those who weep…

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